All’s quiet where I am near the border…

Been off the blog for several days due to the requirements of my real job. But here I am today near the Mexican border, just north of Nogales, Az., at Rio Rico. All is quiet. Have not seen any refugee children from Latin America yet. Have not even seen any illegal aliens sneaking through the sagebrush or hiding behind cacti. I did pass the border check (several miles north of the border) at which all northbound traffic is stopped at least momentarily — I will go through this later today. Always tons of Border Patrol vehicles there, and many officers, many of whom just seem to be standing around. Do the illegal aliens dutifully go through the official border check? One would think they would skirt around that. I know they are looking for drugs too. Sometimes they have drug-sniffing dogs. I am usually not even stopped, just waved through, or maybe I get a quick: are you a U.S. citizen? On a few occasions officers have made a cursory check of my big truck trailer and maybe even peeped into the sleeper to see if I had any passengers

But seriously this issue of so many thousand children crossing into the U.S. unaccompanied is worrisome. Certainly it would seem to me that we have no choice but to provide decent quarters and decent food and water for them while things are sorted out. Some say what is really going on is that parents hope to follow them or other family members are already here. One Mexican-American I heard on a talk show even suggested that many of the children are actually poor Mexicans who are claiming to be from countries in Central and South America whose citizens we offer refugee status to because of the turmoil in their own nations. I would not know myself (and he probably does not either).

It would also seem to me that once each individual’s identity and status is determined that most of them should be sent back to their native lands. We just can’t take care of the whole world. We really need to talk to those countries and find out what their problem is, that is to say why they cannot take care of their own people. It is our business because it is affecting us.

We also are sorely in need of immigration reform. Our so-called political leaders only seem to care about the next election and which side of the issue to be seen on, and they try to be ready to switch at a moment’s notice depending upon which way the wind is blowing.

There are so many competing interests: On the one hand new arrivals offer cheap labor (although some of these may be a little young). On the other hand they compete for U.S. jobs in a wide array of areas, to include agricultural field and packing house work, food service, domestic services, and construction, as well as others. Does a politician try to craft a policy that benefits working people or businesses who favor cheap, vulnerable labor? So-called conservatives rail against our “open” or porous borders but they don’t always support sanctions on businesses who hire undocumented workers. Liberals call illegals “immigrants”, just as if they were people who had applied for citizenship and decry our treatment of them. But at the same time they complain that illegals lured in by business interests compete for jobs and bring wages down.

And just what is our immigration policy and why is it what it is? I have no idea, I must confess, but let me ask you this: do you?

And one more note before I close. Some of the photos I have seen of these refugee children show rather nicely dressed young folk. Poor people don’t look the same as they did in the past. Just an observation, nothing more. I confess I only saw the photos hurriedly. Maybe I should look again.

P.s.

A double check of news reports reminds me that most of these children are coming across the border into Texas. But there is a huge warehouse (complete with coolers) in Nogales being used to temporarily house some of these children, according to one report.

I don’t know what is wrong in Central America and other parts of Latin  America, but maybe all these years if we would have been trying to help the people and not just anti-communist strong men, things might have progressed better. Foreign policy is always a tough one.

P.s. P.s.

As I was leaving Rio Rico I saw the large “Homeland Security” bus at the truck stop with an armed driver. Could not see whether he had passengers. This border stuff is big business. Lots of people on the payroll.

The Border Patrol officer waved me on with a smile after I briefly stopped.

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